New engines in detail

More power, better fuel efficiency

New, powerful and fuel-efficient: the V6 and V8 turbo engines of the Panamera. And they all share a special conceptual design characteristic, which in the jargon of engine developers is known as “with the hot sides inward”.

Translated, this means that the turbochargers of the new Panamera engines are integrated centrally into the V of the cylinder banks. This central turbo layout yields numerous benefits: The engines are more compact, and this enables a lower mounting position. This, in turn, has a positive effect on the vehicle’s centre of gravity. The short paths between the two turbochargers and the combustion chambers produce spontaneous throttle response. Engine response can be further increased using the optional Mode Switch with the Sport Response Button. The Mode Switch, which was first introduced in the Porsche 918 Spyder, is an intuitively operated rotary ring on the steering wheel, which can be used to activate one of four driving modes (Normal, Sport, Sport Plus or Individual). Located at the centre of the switch is the Sport Response Button. It can be used to free up the maximum power potential of the Panamera at the press of a button.

Initially, the Panamera Turbo has the most powerful petrol engine of the model series. Its 4.0-litre biturbo V8 develops 404 kW / 550 hp (at 5,750 rpm) and a maximum torque of 770 Nm (between 1,960 and 4,500 rpm). It has 30 hp more power than the previous model, and its maximum torque has been increased by 70 Nm. The eight-cylinder engine accelerates the Panamera Turbo to 100 km/h in 3.8 seconds; with the Sport Chrono Package the sprint time is just 3.6 seconds. The Porsche can reach a top speed of 306 km/h. These are impressive figures that illustrate just how easily the engine can propel the Panamera with its power-to-weight ratio of just 3.6 kg/hp. These extraordinary performance figures contrast with lower combined fuel consumption figures which, at 9.4 – 9.3 l/100 km, are up to 1.1 l/100 km less than that of the previous model (New European Driving Cycle or NEDC). These figures equate to CO2 emissions of 214 – 212 g/km.

Porsche uses complex twin-scroll turbochargers to supply compressed air to the V8’s combustion chambers. The two counter-rotating chargers produce maximum torque figures at very low engine speeds. The Panamera Turbo is also the first Porsche to be equipped with the new adaptive cylinder control in its engine. In part-load operation, the system temporarily and imperceptibly turns the eight-cylinder into a four-cylinder engine. This reduces fuel consumption by up to 30 per cent, depending on power demand in the four-cylinder phases.

The 2.9-litre V6 biturbo engine of the Panamera 4S develops a maximum power of 324 kW/440 hp (20 hp more than the previous model); it is already available at 5,650 rpm. Between 1,750 and 5,500 rpm, the new six-cylinder delivers 550 Nm (30 Nm more) to the drive axles. The Panamera 4S can reach 100 km/h in just 4.4 seconds (4.2 seconds with the Sport Chrono Package). With a top speed of 289 km/h, this Porsche also approaches the 300 km/h mark. The NEDC combined fuel consumption is 8.2 – 8.1 l/100 km (186 – 184 g/km CO2). Compared to the first generation Panamera 4S, this represents a fuel saving of up to 1.0 l/100 km or eleven per cent.

Like the eight-cylinder engine of the Panamera Turbo, the six-cylinder engine of the Panamera 4S also has petrol direct-injection injectors that are positioned in the combustion chamber. This injector position offers optimal combustion, maximum efficiency and very good engine response. The 4S and Turbo are also characterised by exceptionally full-bodied and authentic sound.

 

The new Panamera is launching with a new eight-cylinder diesel engine, for the first time in conjunction with permanent all-wheel drive. The most powerful diesel implemented in a Porsche production car to date develops a power of 310 kW/422 hp (at 3,500 rpm) and an immense maximum torque of 850 Nm – which is constant over an engine speed plateau extending from 1,000 to 3,250 rpm. With a top speed of 285 km/h, the Porsche Panamera 4S Diesel is currently the world’s fastest production vehicle with a diesel engine. The Gran Turismo reaches the 100 km/h speed mark in 4.5 seconds (4.3 seconds with the Sport Chrono Package). This contrasts with a combined fuel consumption of 6.8 – 6.7 l/100 km (178 – 176 g/km CO2).

The diesel model also has biturbo charging with a central turbo layout. However, its common rail engine (2,500 bar maximum injection pressure) is equipped with sequential turbocharging. This allows the engine to work as a biturbo or monoturbo, depending on the operating state. At low to moderate engine speeds, the entire stream of exhaust gas is directed solely through one of the two turbochargers, which improves throttle response. The otherwise passive second turbocharger does not become active until the engine speed reaches 2,700 rpm or more. Both turbochargers have variable turbine geometry (VTG) – a principle that is already familiar from the 911 Turbo.